Architect: Atelier Tekuto

Atelier Tekuto is an architectural practice with focus on architectural explorations and investigations. They have a strong academic mindset and while some of their work is not always 'in tune' with my own personal design styles, (mine being much more grounded in natural and raw materiality), their work is always very intriguing, thought provoking and quite successful. I truly appreciate that each of their projects is very unique, and created as part of an deeper exploration of something, be it a building material, or concept, and it's always done in concert with the owners needs.

Atelier Tekuto



Lucky Drops House, 2005
Skin House Project No. 7
Tokyo, Japan

This is the house that first caught my attention for Atelier Tekuto. Built on an incredibly constraining site of a long, narrow trapezoid with 3.2m frontage, 29.3m depth, and 0.7m at the end of the site, couple this with the 0.5 meter setback for external walls from adjacent land and you've got some serious constraints!

To create a house on such conditions the team stretched the building out, used a playful and light steel structure, created a transparent skin to allow ample sunlight in, and took advantage of underground space, as it was not limited to the 0.5 meter setback rule. To further expand underground, instead of a thick concrete foundation wall, they used 8mm thick steel plates with anticorrosive, heat insulation and waterproof treatments.

Talk about innovative solutions, and an incredible structure. Though at 660 sq.ft. perhaps a little tight for the four in my family…


Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto


Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto

Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto

Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto

Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto

Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto

Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto

Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto

Lucky Drops House - Atelier Tekuto


Crystal Brick, 2004
Toyko, Japan

This house is so remarkable due to the exploration of layering of glass block, an ordinarily neutral and ordinary object. The way it is used here however, emphasizes spatial demarcations through perception and the use of three types of block: transparent for view, semi-transparent for light, and opaque for private boundary.


Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto

Crystal Brick House - Atelier Tekuto


Parabola, 2007
Tokyo, Japan

This house, situated on a long narrow site, was designed specific for a family who spends the greater part of their day in the living room, which has been given focus on the top floor with prominent scenic views. To do so, it was cantilevered high over the entrance of the house. The parabolic shape of the roof and ceiling was designed to create conflicting feelings of tension and release and to give the room a sense of boundlessness, where the fluctuating tension/release invoke a sense of movement. 

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto

Parabola House - Atelier Tekuto